Earthly Mission

Amazing Maps of Medieval Cities

Some great medieval maps of some great medieval cities for your information and entertainment.

maps-of-medieval-cities-bologna

Bologna

maps-of-medieval-cities-bristol

Bristol

maps-of-medieval-cities-brugge

Brugge

maps-of-medieval-cities-brussels

Brussels

maps-of-medieval-cities-budapest-in-1617

Budapest in 1617

maps-of-medieval-cities-chester

Chester

maps-of-medieval-cities-istanbul

Constantinople

maps-of-medieval-cities-cracow-1493

Cracow 1493

maps-of-medieval-cities-Edirne-1688

Edirne 1688

maps-of-medieval-cities-Granada-1572

Granada 1572

maps-of-medieval-cities-exeter-1617

Exeter 1617

maps-of-medieval-cities-Edinburgh

Edinburgh

maps-of-medieval-cities--Ferrara-1600

Ferrara 1600

maps-of-medieval-cities-florence-1493-nuremberg-chronicle

Florence 1493

maps-of-medieval-cities-hamburg-1572

Hamburg 1572

maps-of-medieval-cities-jerusalem

Jerusalem

maps-of-medieval-cities-lavret

Lavret

maps-of-medieval-cities-london-1560

London 1560

maps-of-medieval-cities-Milan

Milan

maps-of-medieval-cities-orvieto

Orvieto

maps-of-medieval-cities-palmanova-italy

Palmanova Italy

maps-of-medieval-cities-Paris_1550

Paris 1550

maps-of-medieval-cities-paris, 1569

Paris 1569

maps-of-medieval-cities-scandinavia

Scandinavia

maps-of-medieval-cities-sevilla

Sevilla

maps-of-medieval-cities-sevilla2

Sevilla

maps-of-medieval-cities-toledo

Toledo

maps-of-medieval-cities-tunis-1574

Tunis 1574

maps-of-medieval-cities-valleta-malta-1705

Valleta 1705

maps-of-medieval-cities-venezia_1550

Venezia 1550

medieval-map-of-the-holy-land

The Holy Land



6 Comments

  1. Kilroy Nama

    Great compilation. Thanks for all your maps no matter if there´s always a pedantic genius that want to remark that those are not medieval. Thanks and great stuff

    • Spacemaker

      Thanks a lot Kilroy, I have realized that since:)

  2. Bad

    The only one of these maps that could be considered at all medieval is the last one, which was in the Rudimentum noviciorum, published at Lubek in 1475. The others are all from later time periods, mostly from Braun and Hogenberg’s _Civitates Orbis Terrarum_ (Cologne, 1572). Just look at the clothing, for starters.

    This is an important point, because the medievals would not have drawn accurate maps. They strove to draw maps that were “spiritually”, rather than geographically, true. The realization that the real world was worth studying and depicting accurately marked the transition from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance.

    • Spacemaker

      Right, thanks for noting. Somebody has enlingthened me on facebook too. Should have visited Earth (I mean history classes) more often back in the old days…

  3. dBc

    Love your site!

    • Spacemaker

      Thanks a lot! You can now sign up for our weekly digest upon leave, and you won’t miss a post!

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